How to Be Lazy or…Laziness Boot Camp for Overachievers

I used to be crazy busy all the time; it was my way of living. Some of us think that we’re not serving to our full capacity if we’re not in constant motion. Probably it’s part of that Puritan work ethic that still permeates our culture.

I still have many busy days, but I balance them with lots of lazy stretches, from an hour off to a full week-end of vegetation. The big shift is to enjoy and see the value in time off, rather than feeling guilty for not being busy.

Showing my clients how to take time to do nothing, or time to have fun, is a big part of my coaching. The tool I’m sharing with you in this blog post works every single time. And it’s free.

Personally, I have two coaches for this: Prince, the toy poodle, and my teenage son. If my son were any more relaxed than he already is, he’d be in a coma. I think most dogs are accomplished nap coaches, so if a canine shares your space, take a laziness cue from him.

Why has being lazy become so important to me? Entrepreneurs and mothers are supposed to burn the candle at both ends and that was my modus operandi for years! I was proud to be exhausted and burned out.

Here’s the thing. Perpetual motion keeps you in a rut. There can be no breakthrough without R and R.

That’s why my word to serve as my theme for 2010 is “ease.” I’ve had a lot of fun with it, especially with my teaching.

If you’re new to laziness, you need to know that, like any other life skill, it takes practice to attain mastery.

Here’s your basic laziness training exercise:

Take 15 minutes to do nothing.

Doing nothing means no thinking, no reading, no texting, no talking, no praying, no worrying, no listening to your Ipod…not even reading this blog. You just gotta sit there and be a vegetable for 15 minutes. Set a timer on your cell phone, in case you fall asleep. 😉

You’ll hate it at first. Feels unproductive, almost unAmerican.

Stick with it. Your mind will try to convince you that this is the first step on the path to a mental breakdown. It’s not.

Do this at least 5 times a week.

Here’s what you’ll get from doing 15 minutes of nothing on a regular basis:

You relax.

You smile.

Your creativity activates.

You feel so much better. And other people will notice!

Learning to activate your own “pause” button is a powerful tool to experience breakthroughs in your life. Try it and share what happens.

You’ll have to excuse me now, it’s time for me to do nothing. 😉

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5 responses to “How to Be Lazy or…Laziness Boot Camp for Overachievers

  1. It sounds like an easier version of meditation. I love it! I think Edie will be my role model.

  2. You’re right – for folks that are accustomed to being in perpetual motion, being lazy can be a difficult thing to do. However, once you master being lazy it is especially delightful in a hot bubble bath, or on the beach!

  3. Thanks, Sally and Carrie for sharing. This actually is a form of meditation, a intentional way of getting some perspective on what’s really going on in our lives.

  4. THanks for the reminder to do that 15 minute time out. I did it for a while but fell out of the habit.

    • Thanks for stopping by! Getting you back on track is what Mixonian is all about. The time-out gets you the clarity to see the next step. Have super day!

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